Simrad Halo Radar on Dual Range

I have been learning the features of the new Simrad electronics we installed on the FNP.  One of the features I like best is the dual range set up for the Halo radar.  This allows you to run two separate instances of the radar simultaneously at two different ranges.  For example, you can have one on 1/8 mile looking very close to the boat for buoys or other items and another at say 2 miles to give you a better big picture view.  Or perhaps you want one in at 1-3 miles to watch for boats, buoys, etc…, and the other at 24 miles watching the weather.

What is particularly cool is that the digital radar is tuning for both ranges to optimize the returns you are showing at those ranges.  Its not just a zoomed in picture of the same radar return.

While you can also select two different modes for the radar such as bird mode, harbor mode, weather mode, or offshore mode, where the mode results in higher or lower speed of rotation of the radar array, the system must pick one speed or the other and cannot simultaneously rotate at two different speeds.

Here is a short video of how to set this up on your Evo3 display.

Hope you find this useful and that it helps get you out there to catch ’em up!

Finicky Tuna Demand Subtle Presentation – Or Not

Continue reading “Finicky Tuna Demand Subtle Presentation – Or Not”

Cobia!

It’s that time of year on the Panhandle.  Cobia are migrating west along the beaches and the tournaments are in full swing.  If you have never done this, it’s a unique fishery.  It’s all sight fishing for big fish.

Boats move down the beaches with two, three, six, eight people in the tower looking for cruising fish.  Towers range from thirty foot tall welded works of art costing tens of thousands of dollars to step ladders lashed to the bow of a jon boat.  You do what you need to to participate in this adventure.

Once a fish is spotted an angler in the tower casts a bait to the fish.  The bait of choice is a live eel.  Failing that, a grunt, or pinfish, or other medium size bait fish.  If that does not work, a jig, or a shrimp, or whatever works.

The captain may maneuver the boat following the fish for feet, yards, maybe miles while all the offerings are made until the fish eats or disappears under the waves.   Once hooked up the rod is lowered down from the tower on a pulley system and retrieved by the angler in the cockpit and the fight engaged.

This week I was able to get out with the boys on InstiGator, a proven Cobia killing machine with a tournament winning and hardened crew.  The trip did not disappoint, yielding this 61.7 pound beast for angler Big Rick.

While this was an awesome fish, the current first place fish is an astounding 98.8 pounds.

There was plenty to go around so I decided to pull together a little creole cobia treat for dinner.

Yum, that is some good fish.  The recipe:

Garlic, onions, chives, chopped fresh tomatoes, bell pepper, chili pepper, celery, shrimp shells (remove after the sauce simmers for a while) a cup of wine and a cup and a half of water all sauteed and then simmered for about thirty minutes.   Seasoned with salt, pepper and thyme.  Fish is just dredged in flour and pepper and cooked for about four minutes with a bit of oil in a hot skillet and then put in the sauce to finish.  Saute a few shrimp in the same pan and add to the mix.  Garnish with green onion.

Good stuff.

Hope you get out there and catch ’em up!

How to Crimp a Mono Leader

Sorry its been a while since I posted, but lots going on, most of which unfortunately has not involved fishing.  I was prepping to get back on the water this spring and thought some folks might like a little primer on how to properly crimp a leader, so I made this little video.  There are few things more frustrating than hooking up a nice fish only to have the crimp connection fail.  I had it happen once on a nice tuna and have not allowed a repeat.  Hope you find this video helpful.

In the video I eyeballed the right slot in the crimping tool to match the sleeve I was using.  I have done a bunch so was pretty comfortable I had the right size.  I highly recommend that you follow the recommendations on the packaging until you get the feel for the correct pairings of leaders to sleeves and sleeves to crimp tool slots.  Its important to use the right sizes to assure a proper connection that is not so tight that it damages the leader, but tight enough to assure the connection will not slip under pressure.

Good luck out there, and catch ’em up!

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What do you do when you can’t fish?

Well, I get real itchy when I can’t fish.  Can’t sit still.  Have to do something, and this winter was tough.  Between windy and rainy weather and waiting on parts and mechanics, I had to find things to do other than fish.

I did all the usual boat and fishing tackle chores, my honey do’s around the house, some volunteer time, this blog, but still there was a hole to fill. So, I decided to do something nice for my wife for Christmas.  Build something with my own two hands. I knew she would like that even if it turned out terrible.  After all, this is the woman that bought me my deep drop rod and reel, my fishing kite, my jigging rod, even an awesome fillet knife set.  In other words, she supports my addiction so seems fair I do something special for her.

Well, I have literally never none any woodworking.  Perhaps a bit of rough carpentry, but nothing really challenging.  So, why not just jump in head first?  We had some plastic planters on the deck for vegetables and herbs and they were falling apart.  What I knew she would like was a large wooden planter box to replace those.

No problem.  I looked for plans for something like she needed, but nothing really hit the mark, so I sharpened my pencil and designed something myself.

If there are any woodworkers reading this, please stop now and come back when I post about fishing.  You will laugh and snort your drink up and out your nose if you proceed.  I can probably fool the rest of you and make you think I knew what I was doing. 🙂

So, I built this:

I was shocked, it actually came out square and did not collapse when I filled it with dirt!

Anyway, I gave her this for Christmas.  It was quite a challenge assembling it on the deck while she was out on Christmas Eve and hiding it until the morning.  She may have sneaked a peak, she isn’t telling.

She liked it so much she asked me to make a twin for Valentine’s Day. While I was flattered, I was not sure it was a repeatable exercise. Regardless, I decided to give it a shot.  It all came together in the end.  We call them “The Twins.”

I think I may have actually gotten some genes from my machinist grandfather that skipped my lawyer father’s generation.

For anyone interested in the detailed how to of the build, it’s all on video. Again, woodworkers of the world, please close your eyes.

Hope you enjoyed this on a rainy winter day and I hope you get out there and catch ’em up!

Deep Drop on the Blue Spear It

Frenchy called me and asked if I wanted to put that deep drop rig I blogged about to work.  I jumped at the chance.  We loaded up the Blue Spirit and headed south out of Pensacola Pass on a crisp cool morning. The wind was still and the seas smooth making for a nice run out.  Crew was Scott (aka FN Yankee), Mike, Bill, Me and Frenchy.

We stopped and took a quick shot at some bonito for bait, but they were elusive and we did not have time to waste.  So we were reduced to utilizing our stash of assorted frozen ilk including this turducken like cigar minnow stuffed squid.

Yes, squid do eat fish nearly as big as they are.

Here is a little video of the action.

And a few stills:

Turned the grouper into Baked Grouper Parm.

Simple to make.  Just dipped the fish in a mix of egg and milk then dropped in a baggie containing Parmesan cheese, flour, salt and pepper.  Baked for 25 minutes at 350 degrees.  Pairs well with Magic Hat #9 (but then, what doesn’t?).

Until next time, get out there and catch ’em up.

 

 

Swordfish Sword Work of Art

This summer I had the good fortune of catching my first swordfish.  I blogged all about it in FN PAIR-A-DICE Wins Sword Fight.   Click through on that link to see the full story and all the pics, but this is her:

Well, I decided that as a memento of that occasion I wanted to save the bill and do something cool with it.  After a bit of research, I found an artist named RJ Boyle who does really great work painting swordfish bills.   He is also an avid fisherman.  My lovely bride then offered to pay to have him paint mine (she is awesome).

Pictures don’t really do it justice, but you get a much better sense from this short video I did.  I had a blast finding the music to go with it!

Here are some pics as well. (OH, and over there —————>       you sign up for free Yeti cup!

 

In order to do this I first had to prepare the bill.  To do that I wrapped it in some chicken wire, tied a rope to it and threw it off my dock.  There it stayed for a couple of months with all the creatures of the sea enjoying a wee feast.  Occasionally, I pulled it out to see how it was getting along and to pull away pieces of loose flesh.  The nieces and nephews loved these check-ins.  The kids generally fall into two categories, the scientifically intrigued, and the squealers.  I can tell you, it smells pretty nasty for a while.

After all the flesh was off it and it had spent plenty of time in the water I pulled it out and scrubbed it with soapy water with a dash of bleach.  I then put it in the yard to bake in the sun for a couple of weeks.  Washed it again and packed it in borax.  Left it in the borax for a couple of weeks and it was good to go and lemony fresh.

I mailed it off to RJ and he called me when it was ready to paint to ask me generally what I wanted on it.  I sent him a picture of the FN PAIR-A-DICE and he actually painted her on the bill.  That made it extra special to me.  He also painted on the weight and date of the catch.  To see other bills by RJ Boyle, go here.

My next project is to build a proper mount for it.  I started on that task, but have not been happy with what I put together so far.  I really want to make sure I do it justice.

Before you go, please sign up to subscribe by entering your email over there —> in the box on the margin and then make sure you click the email in the link that will send you.  If you are registered as an email follower on January 30, 2017 your name will be in the hat for the FREE custom powder coated and etched Yeti cup from Precision Powder Coating. You can read all the details here.

Good luck, and until next time, Catch ‘Em Up!